BAKERY FLOPS


YOU WILL TAKE THE CLASS IF YOUR BAKERY IS SOMEWHERE AROUND OR UNDER THIS ROT.


-nag papaalsa ng hindi tama, i have had bakers ask me what is the solution to "namamalat" na dough. Kind of surprising considering the owner just told me how (and this baker too) skilled this baker is, how long he had been baking etc.,

if you do not know how to properly proof your doughs, then i will not be surprised to hear why customers leave the bread on your counter after they just bought it


--breads are sometimes collapsing, sometimes tough and sometimes not just right that you get returns


---you do not use an oven thermometer. Yes, believe it or not, i had students who bake breads not knowing how to manipulate their ovens and still manage somehow to sell breads that are sometimes burnt and so on. I think you owe it to the public to serve them the best, not below par, hit and miss breads.


-no weighing scale!!!, really, some bakers from the old and beyond still use the "takal" method, lata ng pineapple juice to measure the water, etc., so if you ask them what the % of water they use, they cannot tell you...


--no standardized recipe. They just do it by the "takal" method, if one ingredient is missing, they just do away with something else with no consideration to what will happen if they substitute this with that.


---turning the oven on and off 4 times per day, even more. Unbelievable. To me, this is the height of incompetency of a baker, and i do not think one has to call himself a baker if he cannot properly time his loading and unloading, when to bake what recipe and how to adjust his baking time etc., etc., This is a crucial part of the baking process. You do not just turn the oven on without thinking which breads should go first and which ones should go next. Every preheating time wastes 30 minutes of gas, multiply that by 4 and you get 2 hours, 1 1/2 of which is a waste of time. You should preheat only once, and the rest of the dough, no matter how big the batch is should be baked in succession. Then you turn the oven off. Once. That's practical management. Very basic.


-if you do not know why the dough sometimes rises and sometimes it does not. You better take the class pronto.


--when you do not know how much you are spending and how much you are supposed to earn per day. 99% of my students who own a bakery have no idea how to do the food costing or even if they do, they could not because the recipes are locked inside the baker's brains.


---your baker does not listen to you. Why should he? He knows you don't know a thing.


-if your baker tells you what to do and not the other way around. You need to know more about this business than your baker. The role must be reversed. He is a baker, but you should know how to bake too. It is not enough to know the theories of yes, the yeast makes the dough rise, you need to show your baker that you can do it too. Otherwise, he will be holding the stick 24/7.


--your bakers work their own time. Cannot be. I hate to say this but i can tell when a baker is into this 100% if he shows up earlier than expected. I have had sessions where the owner and the baker takes the training and the owner arrives earlier than the baker. Pretty annoying to make the owner wait right?


---if your baker does not know why the breads are burnt on the sides and the center is pale. Of course there is something wrong, but to keep on doing this speaks volume of how incompetent the baker is. No troubleshooting?\

__nagpapaalsa ng walang takip ang mga dough, a baker i was training asked my why merong cover ang proofing rack and then asked me later kung papano gagawin niya para hindi mamalat ang dough. The answer to the first question is the second question. You cover the dough to prevent pamamalat or forming of skin on the dough. 

--matigas ang pan de coco at pandesal typical question from a student, solution? better mixing, hydration is higher, DO NOT USE DOUGH ROLLER, if you have a dough roller ditch it.

More to come....